WHAT TO DO INFORMATION

For: HEAVY RAIN AND FLOODING


 CAUTION: Continuous heavy rain can cause flash flood, river flood to low lying areas, coastal flooding, landslide, mudslides, and very low visibility and if it goes with strong winds then it can also cause rough seas.

People are advised to take this 'HEAVY RAIN AND FLOODING WHAT TO DO INFORMATION' seriously.

FOR VILLAGE LEADERS AND FAMILIES

  • Listen to your radio for emergency information – SIBC, FM, HF radio
  • Inform your neighbours and vulnerable people about the current advice
  • If Flood risk increases, Activate Response Plans and move to Safe Area

FOR PEOPLE LIVING CLOSE TO RIVERS AND AREAS UNDER THE THREAT OF FLOODING

  • Keep together important items like radio, mobile phones, torch, knife, food, water, important papers, and important medicines ready to take with you to Safe Area when evacuating.
  • Store drinking water in sealed bottles as water supply may be interrupted (e.g. Dirty or supply cut off)
  • Do not allow children to play in the rain and on flood rising water or drainage Areas
  • If Flood risk increases, Activate your community and family Response Plans and move to Safe Area

FOR MOTORISTS

  • Take extra care when travelling on wet, slippery and flood roads
  • Beware of water covered roads and bridges
  • Make sure you have your lights on and drive at less than 40km  per hour speed
  • Double the distance you leave between your car and the car in front of you as stopping distance are increased by wet roads
  • Do not attempt to cross flowing rivers and large streams of unknown depth

FOR BOATS AND SHIPPING

  • Mariners are advise to be extra caution when planning or travelling out in the sea
  • Avoid travelling at all if you can
  • When going out in the sea , always inform someone of where about you are going and your expected time of travel
  • Take extra fuel, puddles, life-jackets, torch-light, spare batteries, water and some food when travelling.

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TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING CANCELLATION

TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING CANCELLATION ISSUED BY THE SOLOMON ISLANDS METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE AT 9:00AM THIS MORNING ON SATURDAY 16TH FEBRUARY 2019.

THE TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING IS NOW CANCELLED, HOWEVER A STRONG WIND WARNING (15 TO 25 KNOTS, REACHING 30 KNOTS AT TIMES) STILL INFORCE OVER MOST WATERS AND LAND AREAS OF SOLOMON ISLANDS.

AT 5:00 AM THIS MORNING, TROPICAL CYCLONE OMA (CATEGORY TWO) WITH A CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 977 HECTOPASCALS WAS LOCATED NEAR 15.4 DEGREES LATITUDE SOUTH AND 164.2 DEGREES LONGITUDE EAST. THIS IS LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 133 NAUTICAL MILES (247KM) WEST OF ESPIRITU SANTO ISLAND, VANUATU. THE CYCLONE IS MOVING WEST-SOUTHWEST AT 03 KNOTS AND INTENSIFYING.

EXPECT WINDS OF 15 TO 25 KNOTS (27-46KM/HR) INCREASING TO 30 KNOTS (56KM/HR) AT TIMES OVER MOST WATERS AND LAND AREAS WITH MODERATE TO ROUGH SEAS AND MODERATE SWELLS (2.5M-3.0M). 

EXPECT RAIN, HEAVY AT TIMES AND THUNDERSTORMS OVER MAKIRA, RENNELL/BELLONA, AND TEMOTU PROVINCES. 

THIS IS THE FINAL TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING FOR TROPICAL CYCLONE OMA. PLEASE REFER TO STRONG WIND AND HEAVY RAIN WARNINGS FOR FURTHER UPDATES.

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Emergencies: Dial - 955 (Disaster), 933 (Weather), 977 (Marine), 999 (Police & Fire)

Media Release

National Disaster Management Office, Honiara, Solomon Islands

October 12th 2017

 

7 Years, 7 Targets (2016-2022); The Sendai Seven Campaign

“Home Safe Home: Reducing Disaster, Reducing Displacement”

#switch2sendai #IDDR2017

 

“Home Safe Home” is the theme for International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction 2017 held on Friday 13th October. Solomon Islands will celebrate this with a public event at Town Council Grounds near Vavaya Ridge bus stop between 8.30am and 4.30pm.

 

The program will include: presentations and awareness material on what to do in a natural disaster and tips on how to prepare your family to minimize risk, music, quiz’s and giveaway prizes.

The “Home Safe Home” theme recognizes that the home is a refuge during times of disaster and during recovery. In the Solomon Islands it is important that we know how to prepare for and lessen the impacts of different disasters, both expected and unexpected.

 

Awareness talks are being held during this week at many different schools to highlight key information to prevent, protect and reduce the number of people affected during a disaster and especially the number of people displaced.

 

Honiara City Disaster Management Office and its partners have visited schools on the eastern side of town to speak to primary and secondary school students about what they can do to keep themselves and others safe and healthy before, during or after a natural disaster.

 

“It is important to go to the primary and secondary schools and talk about how to prepare for a disaster. Our students are the ones who will take this information back to their families and their communities. They are our future generations. If we teach them at the young levels then they will carry this information with them as they grow up”.

Keithy Sale, Research and Development Officer, NDMO, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

 

Students have received practical and scientific information surrounding major hazards and natural disasters relevant to the Solomon Islands.

 

Students have had questions of their own too. They have also asked NDMO staff and partners important questions that show that they also want to take an active role in keeping themselves and others safe.

 

Mercy Primary School students asked:

1) If a tsunami comes, what can we do?

2) If an earthquake hits us, how long will it take to generate a tsunami?

3) Do Tsunami’s make a sound when they come?

 

Students at Woodford School asked:

Where is the nearest evacuation place to go when there is a disaster?

Is an earthquake predictable?

What is the highest magnitude of earthquake to hit the Solomon Islands?

 

International Disaster Day began 25 years ago when the UN decided to dedicate 13th October to highlight the impacts of disasters on peoples lives, livelihoods and health as well as impacts on economic, physical, cultural, social and environmental assets of people, businesses, communities and countries. The Sendai Seven Campaign began in March 2015 as an outcome of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Japan. Its seven key targets will be spread over seven years:

  • – Target (a): Substantially reduce global disaster mortality by 2030, aiming to lower the average per 100,000 global mortality rate in the decade 20202030 compared to the period 2005-2015;
  • – Target (b): Substantially reduce the number of people affected globally by 2030, aiming to lower the average global figure per 100,000 in the decade 20202030 compared to the period 2005-2015;
  • – Target (c): Reduce direct disaster economic loss in relation to global gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030;
  • – Target (d): Substantially reduce disaster damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services, among them health and educational facilities, including through developing their resilience by 2030;
  • – Target (e): Substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020;
  • – Target (f): Substantially enhance international cooperation to developing countries through adequate and sustainable support to complement their national actions for implementation of the present Framework by 2030;
  • – Target (g): Substantially increase the availability of and access to multi-hazard early warning systems and disaster risk information and assessments to people by 2030.

In 2016 the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) recorded 24.2 million people worldwide were displaced from their homes. The majority of deaths from natural disasters are caused by extreme geo-physical disaster events like earthquakes and tsunamis. Solomon Islands, being along the Ring of Fire are at high risk of these.

 

This year, on the 6th of May, Cyclone Donna (category 3) caused minimal damage to Temotu Provinces, with and estimated 10, 000 people affected because of impacts to: health, education, fisheries, agriculture, homes, water and sanitation.

 

On the 10th of December 2016, an earthquake off the coast of Makira and southern part of Malaita, caused minimal damages to property and environment. Damage was recorded for 9510 houses and 33, 236 people were affected. The impacted of this on people livelihoods and food security are still being felt.

 

April 2014 saw Honiara and Guadalcanal experience its worst flooding on record. In particular, from the 1st-4th of April 2014, the Mataniko River experienced heavy flooding. This was initially caused by heavy and sustained rainfall. A logjam formed further up river, which then caused the river to burst its banks around the community of Tuvaruhu. This resulted in loss of 22 lives as well as widespread damage to homes, property and major infrastructure including roads and bridges.

 

Not all natural hazards create disasters; other natural, cultural, social and political factors also contribute. This is why it is very important for people as well as authorities to know how and to act responsibility and appropriately.

 

The Town Council Grounds and schools events will provide information on how we can work together to build safer and stronger communities. All public are welcome and encouraged to attend to see how we can all make our families more ready to stay safe during a disaster and not be burdened by as much damage to property and other things.

 

If students wish to collect additional information for their studies they are encouraged to come see our research team at NDMO located in the blue building near Barak in Ranadi.

 

Regular updates will be provided to our main media sources, especially through SIBC and the Dis Taem Nao program.

 

You can visit our website www.ndmo.gov.sb for further updates and information.

#switch2sendai #IDDR2017

 

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